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and legacy of dr. martin luther king jr., i am pleased to be joined by dr. clayborne carson, the director of the mlk research and education institute at stanford. he joins us tonight from colorado. always good to have you back on this program. >> great to be with you. tavis: at the king day to you. what do you make of the fact that, on this day, we do not just celebrate the legacy and life of dr. king, but the first african-american president inaugurated for the second time? >> there is so much to celebrate on this day and so much to remember about the part of king's dream that has not been fulfilled. particularly the issue of poverty. there are so many things that make us thankful that the civil- rights reforms were achieved. i think it is important, particularly on this day, to remember that, if king were around, he would be pushing us to deal with that have -- that pestering issue of poverty. tavis: why is it that you think that, with all the evidence supporting the notion that pozner -- the poverty is threatening our democracy, it is a matter of national security, one out of two ameri
was today barack obama's inauguration, it was also martin luther king day. for his thoughts on this historic occasion we're joined by senior black correspondent morgan freeman. >> thanks, jim. that's okay. sorry. >> jon: i got it. wait. the president was inrawing ated today >> jon: yes, that's right i guess i was so busy being angry about having to work on martin luther king day, i didn't realize i was also missing the second inauguration of the first black president which now makes me even more angry. thanks, jon. >> jon: sorry. it's okay, jon. look, as long as we're celebrating dr. king's birthday, i would like to make one request. can we as a nation please, please stop using martin luther king as a prop in our own petty political arguments >> jon: you mean about race? no, jon. about everything. listen to what the chairman of national gun appreciation day said last week >> i believe gun appreciation day honors the legacy of dr. king. i think he would agree with me if he were alive today. >> let me stop you right there. he is not alive today. now what was it that killed him? i don't know, j
using martin luther king as a prop in our own petty political arguments >> jon: you mean about race? no, jon. about everything. listen to what the chairman of national gun appreciation day said last week >> i believe gun appreciation day honors the legacy of dr. king. i think he would agree with me if he were alive today. >> let me stop you right there. he is not alive today. now what was it that killed him? i don't know, jon. was it diabetes? >> jon: i don't think so sandwich choke maybe? mauled by lions on the porch of a memphis hotel? i don't know. >> jon: i don't think that was it >> you were talking about dr. king. >> he would agree with me if he were alive today. that if african-americans had been given the right to keep and bear arms from day one of the country's founding, perhaps slavery might not have been a chapter in our history. >> slavery wouldn't have been a chapter. it would have been oppressive. followed by the chapter entitled all the black people are dead. now who is going to build the country? >> jon: you believe martin luther king would have favored gun control >> ab
march on washington through prominent historian and martin luther king jr.'s papers. >> up next on booktv after words with guest host authors and play right janet langhart cohen. this week is dorian clayborne carson and "martin's dream" my journey and the legacy of martin luther king, jr.. in it he recalls his journey from teenage civil rights activist to his presence at the 1963 march on -- he includes encounters with the many leaders and organizers in the civil rights movement including stokely carmichael and the king family. it's about an hour. >> host: dr. carson thanks for joining me on after words. >> guest: it's my pleasure. >> host: your book, "martin's dream" is a memoir and a history book. in the book you talk about your personal journey and you are very candid about your life and you also cover new insights as a historian to the life and legacy of dr. martin luther king jr.. what prompted you to write the book this way? >> guest: well, i wanted to write about the martin luther king anniversary and 50 years of my life that came to light and his legacy and life coincides with m
. i picked up my newspaper and there was martin luther king, the little rock nine, the students and dissidents -- in the sit-ins. i'm in college, i get to go to this student meeting, national student association meeting in indiana -- indianapolis. >> host: which is my home town. >> guest: and i met stokely carmichael. he was the first person sncc. he dismissed that. how could you think about going to that pyknic? >> host: >> guest: he didn't say that in terms of martin luther king. he was one of the people the was going to be at the march. i think that just for me he felt that i should be in georgia and cambridge maryland and he was at the university at the time, said he would be going to these places where his activism instead of going to the march 1 just was not what he had in mind, and i think that he was trying to recruit me into the movement. but for me going for the most exciting and radical thing that i'd done in my life at that point. >> host: let's go back to the march when he gave that address. what did you think of the speech? did you think it would be iconic for the
there was three of us. now sometimes children you don't think of dr. martin luther king jr. as a child but he was really a child and grew up just like you, and so that's why i wanted to write this book. the book is entitled" my brother martin." it has lots of illustrations in it. i hope that you will have a chance to get to see the book more closely. ok. so this is part of it. a sister remembers. the sister, of course, is me. ok. the book starts out -- i will arche some words that martine some more of the martin said and the march i have a dream that one day little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with the little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers. i have a dream today. that's what he said in washington, d.c. at the lincoln memorial. ok. the book starts out and it has a picture of me. now when i wrote this book, i envisioned that i would be reading to children just like you, and the reason i thought of that is because my grandmother and my aunt lived in the home with us and many times they would baby-sit for my mother and father and they would sit and read
martin hraoutor king jr.? -- luther king jr.? all right. ok. do you realize he was a little boy one time just like you? ok. you knew him i'm sure as an adult. so this morning or early afternoon, i'm going to read to you from the book that i wrote about him. he was my brother and we had one other brother so there was three of us. now sometimes children you don't think of dr. martin luther king jr. as a child but he was really a child and grew up just like you, and so that's why i wanted to write this book. the book is entitled" my brother martin." it has lots of illustrations in it. i hope that you will have a chance to get to see the book more closely. ok. so this is part of it. a sister remembers. the sister, of course, is me. ok. the book starts out -- i will quote some words that martin said on the march on washington. i have a dream that one day little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with the little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers. i have a dream today. that's what he said in washington, d.c. at the lincoln memorial. ok. the book starts out an
the memory of dr. martin luther king jr. this weekend, we cap off the 10th anniversary week by revisiting our conversation with a civil rights icon in her own right, coretta scott king. back in 2005, we traveled to atlanta for a very special program with miss king at the famed ebenezer baptist church, the church that was home base for dr. king during much of the civil rights movement. a conversation which would turn out to be one of her last on national television. we're glad you could join us to wrap up this 10th anniversary week with a conversation with coretta scott king, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: as we kick off our second season in 2005, we could
>>> book tv continues with mr. kotz on martin luther king, jr.. this is about an hour. [applause] >>> good evening. it's a pleasure to be with you all. just two days shy of martin luther king's birthday, to talk about some things that took place in the 1960's that literally changed the history of this country. i am hoping to call on you all to participate in this talk about not only why those things happen in the 60's, but to talk about where do we go from here in a society that has despite great accomplishment has not fulfilled the passion and the dreams of lyndon johnson and martin luther king in a more just society. but i must tell you what we are sitting in today and the interactive exhibits are out of the hallways and the public walls of the national archives are a totally new phenomenon. .. he has been riding the horse since the day he got here, and thanks to karlin's leadership. thanks to marvin pinkert, he calls the genius behind the development of the new space. all of us as citizens can far better experience our history, and as a journalist, as a historian, and as a cit
king. and late this afternoon, president obama paused before the bust of martin luther king in the capital rotunda. a historic president paying tribute to the man who made that history possible. 50 years after the march on washington, 150 years after the emancipation proclamatioproclam president obama begins his second term, recommitting the nation to our founding ideas with liberty and justice for all. >>> joining me now is former congressman barney frank, democrat from massachusetts and melissa harris perry, host of "the melissa harris perry show" here on msnbc. >>> chairman frank, i mean, this was an amazing day. and the inaugural parade is still going on. the president is watching from his viewing stand. and when you look at his speech today, i sat there and listened. a lot of people were surprised at how he took on some issues and really raised a new page in american history in terms of where he felt the future of this country should go, chairman frank? >> i think it was an entirely legitimate victory lap. that is we had a very tough election, in which fundamental issue
of martin luther king's birthday, to talk about things that took place in9 the 1960s. there's literally changed the history of this country.. i'm h oping to call on you all o participate in this to talk about hy those things happened in the 1960's but to talk about where do we go from here in a society that has, despite great accomplishment, has not fulfilled the passion and the dreams of lyndon johnson and martin luther king for a more just society. but i must tell you that what we are sitting in today and the interactive exhibits around the hallways and the public vaults of the national archives are a totally new phenomenon. i remember as a kid and when my son jack was a kid you walked into this austere building and you stood in a line and you saw the constitution and the declaration and maybe another couple of things, and you marched back out. lyndon johnson had an expression which he used often and usually shrewdly where he would say that someone was all hat and no horse. i have learned in the case of kansas farmer who became a governor and is now our archivist he has been riding a
. stevie wonder, a man who has personified not only the obamas, but also martin luther king day, bought he was one of the people who got the day created in the first place and made martin luther king's birthday a national holiday. i talked to him about that, about the first couple, about gun control, about many things. a fascinating few minutes with a living musical legend. >> stevie wonder, how are you? >> great. how are you? >> is that your british accent? >> i was born in england, actually. i louvre e moved to the states. >> this is a huge night. and for you, i guess, a very special day. you campaigned very hard to have a national holiday on martin luther king day. this is that day, and it's the day that barack obama is inaugurated again. how do you feel today? >> very excited, very, very happy. i feel like there's so many things that i envisioned, that i saw, and those things are happening, coming true. the only thing i'm hoping for is that we truly will get people together. you know, sometimes i wish we could have even more than a democratic party and republican party, a united party.
your life and cover new insights as a historian from the life and legacy of dr. martin luther king, jr.. what prompted you? >> guest: it is the 50th anniversary and it is 50 years of mine life of the king legacy and to my coming of age. part of it was to do the to tasks. that my life had been connected to the keying legacy -- king legacy and how king impacted me and i was involved with this amazing journey of editing king's papers. >> host: it is an excellent reid and we are of the same generation and i was also coming of age. it was bittersweet because i knew dr. king he was my mentor. but bitter because the way he was taken from us because of racial hatred. we can start at the beginning the kids you're on the mall with dr. king and at the end you were there again with 50 years later with the monument you help to design. >> guest: and coming back for important occasions. i only lived in washington a short time but the mall had a great symbolic meaning and sentimental. >> host: it is a beautiful city. 19 years ago, the march on washington where he gave the speech i have a dream. how di
luther king and, therefore, really celebrating the work of martin luther king, jr. i just want to remind people that he wrote the text after the passage of the '64 civil rights act. the two acts that we think within the civil rights agenda, at that moment, king, himself, only felt that he was half there. maybe a third of the way to wra wra wards the goal. >> there's no question about that, e.j. but when you look at the fact that there was record numbers of turn outs of voters. the people got it. a lot of people had been out cast. and a lot of people that never had any concrete addressing of their needs. when you deal with unploimt insurance and you deal with pell grants. these are both on the right and the left. but it meant a lot to people which is why people made sure they reelected him, e.j. >> there are two things, one is just as you say, the turnout was extraordinary. and you had a real test in this solution. yes, president obama was well-funded, but you had enormous sums on the other side trying to beat him. in democracy, showing no matter how poor you are, your vote counts equally
when did you first get to be interested in martin luther king? >> guest: when i was in high school as a young fellow growing up in atlanta georgia my parents didn't have an answer. it became kind of a quest to find out about it in the sense that there was enormous power and that would change the direction of my life. when i wasn't looking for it to happen. c-span: how many of your years did you think about this? >> guest: i started after i got into a book career in the late 70's after magazine journalism. i wanted to write about this period because i hadn't answered the question what is it made of and i thought in 1981 with what was proposed to be a three year history of the teen years and it's now been 16 years and i've done it in two volumes is now projected to be a trilogy or will be a trilogy after i finish it but i would have 20 years. definitely turning into my life work but i'm thankful for the privilege of it. c-span: the first book, parting the waters, 1,056 pages. this but there are 546 pages. what's been your approach? >> guest: to do it in storytelling. one of the reaso
uncle gave the famous speech, martin luther king's niece says america needs to wake up before a nightmare. >> ladies and gentlemen, governor mike huckabee. >> mike: thank you, thank you very much. a great studio audience and thank you for joining us, welcome to huckabee, live from the fox news studios in new york city. although he was actually sworn in today in a private ceremony, tomorrow is the day for the public swearing in for president obama to begin his second term. now, if the walkup to the festivities are any indication i've got no reason to believe he's going to seek to build bridges, work for consensus or abandon the flaming rhetoric calling those who oppose him irresponsible and unpatriotic. after the horrific mass murder of children and faculty at sandy hook elementary in connecticut there were many pledges of thoughtful and thorough efforts to prevent such atrocities. supposedly, everything would be on the table, not just access to firearms by criminals or mentally deranged people, but the mental health care system shall the role of violence in hollywood televisio
our children safe. >> and after her uncle gave the famous speech, martin luther king's niece says america needs to wake up before a nightmare. >> ladies and gentlemen, governor mike huckabee. >> mike: thank you, thank you very much. a great studio audience and thank you for joining us, welcome to huckabee, live from the fox news studios in new york city. although he was actually sworn in today in a private ceremony, tomorrow is the day for the public swearing in for president obama to begin his second term. now, if the walkup to the festivities are any indication i've got no reason to believe he's going to seek to build bridges, work for consensus or abandon the flaming rhetoric calling those who oppose him irresponsible and unpatriotic. after the horrific mass murder of children and faculty at sandy hook elementary in connecticut there were many pledges of thoughtful and thorough efforts to prevent such atrocities. supposedly, everything would be on the table, not just access to firearms by criminals or mentally deranged people, but the mental health care system shall the role of
: what would martin luther king jr. be doing if he were alive today? chances are he wouldn't be working for the koch brothers. coming up next. only on current tv. [ voice of dennis ] allstate. with accident forgiveness, they guarantee your rates won't go up just because of an accident. smart kid. [ voice of dennis ] indeed. are you in good hands? the tons of obama merchandise. we have some souvenirs like the john boehner commemorative inaugural republican drinking glass. it's always half empty, never half full, and it's perfect for when you want to cry in your own beer in public. and the rush limbaugh commemorative inaugural bucket of sand. designed to bury your head neck deep so ignore history and facts and it's big enough to hold all your viagra for those guy weekend in the dominican republic. google it. and for the kids we've got the inaugural commemorative radio-controlled drone flyer. now children can fly like an eagle and spy like one, too. and lil drone can also fly into other people's yards and destroy stuff. the insight and analysis. current tv presents the presidential ina
to the collection action sound bite the you have that and then get to martin luther king thoughts in a minute. run that first one, the collective action comment. >> we always understood when times change, so must we. if i dellty to the founding principles requires new response to new challenges. preserving our individual freedom ultimately requires collective action. no single person can train all the math and science teachers we'll need to equip our children for the future, or build the roads and networks and research labs that will bring new jobs and businesses to our shores. now, more than ever, we must do these things together. as one nation. and one people. >> dana: okay. if you just listen to that you think we'll all work together. if you are reading between the lines, greg, what did you hear in that? >> greg: who uses the word "collective action" anymore other than ows protesters and exbombers with pony tails now tenure academic campuses? the only collective action that works are garbage men. it's, it reminds you, that you can't take the teachers lounge out of the grad opportunity. it will
of the president talking about a conversations you had with dr. martin luther king and of course tomorrow is mlk day. it couldn't be a more appropriate day. i'm sure you would feel for barack obama's second inauguration. but in those conversations with martin luther king, he felt there may be an african-american president, the first black president in the next 40 years. you didn't think it would happen in your lifetime. >> it's -- that's true. i'm so excited. i'm so happy about my country. that we are growing up. >> and how do you think the president -- >> we are moving beyond ignorance. >> right. how do you think. >> sorry? >> how do you think he's done, president obama, in the first term and what would you like him to do more of in his second term? >> well, i think he's done the best he could. i think that there were number of people who as soon as he was elected put their feet down in -- their heels in to the earth and said, no matter what he does, no matter how good he is, i will not support him. i will resist his attempts to make our country better. i think that he was -- i think he was sur
is live here in d.c. tonight. also the day the nation honors dr. martin luther king jr. and the president said he really drew inspiration from dr. king and abraham lincoln for today's speech, ed. >> that's right, shep. you heard the president citing both of them, talking a lot about civil rights and really casting himself as someone who wants to carry on their civil rights legacies. i think the broadered message of that what it means in the current political environment is he made very clear that he just didn't win the last election. he believes he has a mandate. he believes he is going to be very aggressive in the days ahead. he was talking about taking action on climate change, immigration reform and at a time when everyone in washington is talking about debt and deficits. he also gave a very rigorous defense of entitlement spending, take a listen. >> the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medicaid security, these things do not sap our initiative. they strengthen us. [ applause ] they do not make us a nation of takers. they free us to take the risks that make this co
of martin luther king and abraham lincoln. this is martin luther king day. we celebrate that, as well. the second time a president has been inaugurated on martin luther king day. about 800,000 people will be there on the mall. a little bit smaller than four years ago. but no less buoyant. a lot of smiling faces out there. we hear the choir of p.s. 22 in staten island. >> they are the largest choir in staten island. and i believe they are fifth graders. let's listen to them for a second. ♪ don't pay no mind to the feeling, until you feel it ♪ >> we love the caps. we love the swaying this morning. we've been thinking to ourselves, a second inauguration is typically not as -- not as surprising as the first inauguration. but nonetheless, it rededicates this country to big ideas. and the person who has to do it in his speech, walking up to the podium, is the president. we saw the first family walking in to st. john's church earlier this morning. >> they're at that worship service right now. there they are, right there, just before they walked into st. john's episcopal church, across th
barack hussein obama do solemnly swear. >> reporter: or talk about martin luther king. mr.bam made history uttering a three letter word never spoken in an inaugural address, gay. >> our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated fairly under the law. >> reporter: he urged congress to work with him. >> we cannot mistake absolutism for principle or substitute spectacle for politics. >> reporter: people who waited for hours embraced the harsher tone, the smaller crowd of 700, 000. anita jackson told me crunching numbers is missing the point of the inauguration rich with history and four years later, hope. >> i'm so proud and honored to be a part of this environment today. >> reporter: before leaving the capitol steps today, mr. obama took one last look over the gigantic spectacle and said, i will never see this again. >>> a group of east bay students made it to washington, d.c. for the inauguration but getting there was not easy. for half of the 46 students from claremont middle school, it was their first trip out of lake
kicks off the second term on martin luther king day. today and inauguration day special. we will air highlights from last ides' peace ball including naacp president benjamin jealous. >> the challenge for our country is never to see the day when a person of color would be president, nor the challenge for our country was to ensure that it would be safe for it to i hae -- happen again and again. >> we'll also hear from the legendary poet son the sanchez, ralph nader, sweet honey and the rock, and angela davis. >> let me say this time around we cannot subordinate our aspirations and our hopes to presidential agenda. >> we will look at big money behind the inauguration. four years ago president obama refused to accept corporate donations, but this year exxonmobil, at&t, christoph are among the biggest backers of today's festivities. -- microsoft are among the biggest backers of today's festivities. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. the teenage gunman is in custody after allegedly killing five members of his family in new mexico on satur
't believe that now there's a monument to martin luther king on the mall. and that an african-american president is being -- is being elected and for her, she said the most humble tone, these were dreams that were dangerous to even articulate when i was growing up and now i'm seeing america in that way. this is the beauty of this day. you have the president being inaugurated at a time that coincides with martin luther king's birthday. and it's a good reminder that as tough as things seem, bob, as difficult and challenging of a moment we should in american history, this idea that we are a country that is constantly evolving and changing and the president has a chance to make some incredible history now. immigration reform i think is going to be strong. i think he can find a note of unity on gun safety. here you have a nation where over 80% of gun owners believe in things like universal background checks and closing secondary markets. this gives the president the arc of the moral universe and bending it to justice and showing that this country is strong at the core. >> mr. mayor
it is amazing that he is taking the oath of office on the bible of lincoln and martin luther king, and martin luther king had this to say, and if i can quote him -- it is a simple matter of justice with the task of raising the negro from backwardness should also be rescuing the forgotten a white sport. a bill of rights for the disadvantaged, marked the rise of a new era in which the full resources of society would be used to attack the tenacious poverty which so paradoxical exists here. >> that is tim from gainesville, florida. he mentioned the lincoln and bible and the king bible. the lincoln bible itself, according to the library of can -- of congress, is bound in burgundy velvet with a gold washed white metal rim around the three outside edges of the covers. all edges are heavily guilt. in the center of -- of the top cover, there is a shield of cold wash with the words "holy bible" etched into it. the king bible was dr. king's trebling bible. an avid reader, dr. king traveled with a selection of books that included this bible the president will be using. it was used for inspiration and pre
alone with martin luther king in madrid of all places and the other one is about one of the really terrible servients of th cold war which is when the united states drops four hydrogen bombs on omatiain, lucy unarmed and not on purpose and i will tell you that story, two different stories. before i do that i thought i would tell you about a few other chapters in the book and by the way i brought along a lot of copies, i will write servieryth you write in their. because i'm always looking for readers. that is why you write books. this is my fifteenth book. i write fiction, non-fiction, journalism, i go back and forth. i nservier wanted to make up my mind who wanted to be when i grow up and never have so i go back and forth between this and literary forms. one of the chapterby a couple chapters in the book i might mention and get on to the martin luther king story, one of the chapters is about making the movie doctors of auto, dr. zhit zhivago though marjorie fears his father ran geraldine chaplin his mother and their the picture in the book in the spanish edition and the american po
. that begins at 9:30. the first family urges all americans to help honor dr. martin luther king jr. >> then tomorrow, president obama and vice president biden are officially sworn in for their second terms. the ceremony happens monday. >> crews are still putting together the final preparations for monday's inauguration. we have team coverage starting off with nbc's daniel lee. she's live on the mall with more now. good morning, danielle. >> reporter: good morning. in just hours, thousands of people will be coming to the national mall here. many will be coming to tsee the memoria memorials, but they're also going to a tent that's been put up in honor of the national day of service. the crowds have arrived packed for a party. >> this is one of my bucket list experiences. >> reporter: tiffany grimes thrflew in from atlanta. her first stop was the national mall. >> over 200,000 people sign up nationwide. >> reporter: amelia is attending. she's here from new orleans. like four years ago, president obama has asked people nationwide to join his family and celebrate by serving. this year t
lincoln, and the other by martin luther king jr., known for his civil rights and anti-poverty activism. the inauguration comes on january 21, the federal holiday in honor of the civil-rights leader who delivered his i have a dream" speech 50 years ago the lincoln memorial. he has addressed the issue of martin luther king and poverty before in 2011 when he spoke at the dedication of the martin luther king monument at the national. >> nearly 50 years after the march on washington, our work, dr. king's work, it is not yet complete. we gather here at the moment of great challenge and great change. in the first decade of this new century, we have been tested by war and by tragedy, economic crisis and its aftermath that has left millions out of work in poverty on the rise and millions more to struggle to get by. indeed, even before this crisis struck, we have entered a decade of rising inequality and stagnant wages, and too many troubled never across the country the conditions of our poor citizens appear a little changed from what existed 50 years ago. neighborhoods with underfunded schools
king jr. memorial. we'll show that. today celebration, martin luther king day, as well. and, robin, i know you're watching at home this morning, as we prepare for this moment of history. i wish you could be down here with us. i know everyone up in new york shares that sentiment. hello to all you guys this morning. we're going to be down here all day long covering the inauguration. and, josh, all weekend, we've been tracking the celebration of the president, the lead-up to the inauguration. including what the president called the most significant event this weekend. >> indeed. the bangs that thrilled the nation. of course, his dear wife and the hair. there's so much to get to today. what a mood of celebration here in the nation's capital. so many, hundreds of thousands of people, turning out this weekend, to celebrate this inauguration. all a part of the lead-up to today's big public swearing-in. and of course, the parade to follow. overnight, the president attended the first event of his second term. a candlelight reception. >> what we're doing is celebrating each other and celebratin
, the national observance of martin luther king jr.'s birthday. >> earlier 25today, president obama and vice president biden traveled to the martin luther king jr. monument. >> mother person who was sut cut down. medger evers was shot. and you're the first lay woman, usually it's clergy who gives the invocation, they've told you three minutes does that make you anxious? >> three minutes. no, it doesn't. first of all, i'm just thrilled. i'm so honored to have been asked to deliver the invocation. to get it down to three minutes is going to be a little difficult for me. but i've gone through it and i think i will be successful. if not, perhaps they'll turn the mike off. i don't know. >> they'll play music loud and someone will haul you off the stage. ironically, it was 50 years ago that you were trying to get to the march on washington. >> that is correct. >> and you obviously could not. >> i was in boston, and had just delivered a speech there. transportation was slow. i got to washington and could not get to the stage. it was so disappointing. and for years, heartbreaking. because i wanted s
the goals. >> the goals of -- i'm sure he'll bring in martin luther king and the goals that he shares with him and with the country. and trying to get congress to work together to pass all the initiatives. >> marcela, you have the whole list ticked off in your head there. thank you so much for the work that you're doing today. everyone, we're back to work. say back to work. back to you. >> robin, thanks very much. everyone is due to arrive here at the capitol less than two hours from now. at this moment, he's beginning the start of his second term in prayer. our white house correspondent brianna keilar is outside st. john's church. that's right near the white house. our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin is on the national mall. brianna, let's go to you first. tell us what's going on. what is about to happen? >> reporter: hi there, wolf. i am across from the church where president obama and mrs. obama are inside sitting, not in the traditional president's pew, but in the first row, as is the vice president and his family, and i want to show you, if this bus will move behin
, on what would be martin luther king's 84th birthday, we're a nation still working on a dream. the right wing responds to the tolerance comment. >>> and what does miracle on the hudson hero captain sully sullenberger have to do with arizona governor jan brewer? there's a connection. we'll explain it ahead. you're watching "politicsnation" on the place for politics, msnbc. ♪ [ male announcer ] here's a word that could give you peace of mind. unbiased. some brokerage firms are. but way too many aren't. some of the ones that push mutual funds with their names on them -- aren't. why? because selling their funds makes them more money. which makes you wonder -- isn't that a conflict? am i in the best fund for me, or them? search "proprietary mutual funds". yikes, it's best for them. then go to e-trade. we've got over 8,000 mutual funds and not one of them has our name on it. why? because that's not the business we're in. we're in the business of finding the right investments for you. e-trade. less for us. more for you. >>> have you joined the "politicsnation" conversation on facebook yet? we
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